Proceeding | OPEN ACCESS

Prevalence and management of dyslipidaemia in hypertensive patients attending Federal Medical Centre, Asaba, Delta State

Angela O Obaseki , Azuka C Oparah

1Department of Pharmacy, Federal Medical Centre, Asaba, Delta State, Nigeria.; 2Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmacy Practice, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, PMB 1154, Benin City, 300001, Nigeria..

For correspondence:-  Angela Obaseki   Email:  obasekiangela27@gmail.com

Published: 28 December 2018

Citation: Obaseki AO, Oparah AC. Prevalence and management of dyslipidaemia in hypertensive patients attending Federal Medical Centre, Asaba, Delta State. J Sci Pract Pharm 2018; 5(1):201-202 doi: https://doi.org/10.47227/jsppharm/v5i1.06

© 2018 The author(s).
This is an Open Access article that uses a funding model which does not charge readers or their institutions for access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0) and the Budapest Open Access Initiative (http://www.budapestopenaccessinitiative.org/read), which permit unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited..

Abstract

Purpose: To investigate prevalence, describe pattern and management of dyslipidaemia in hypertensive patients.

Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on hypertensive patients attending Federal Medical Centre, Asaba.

Results: A total of 518 patients were evaluated.  Prevalence of dyslipidaemia was 55.8%. The mean percentage reduction on LDLC was Atorvastatin 34.3%, Simvastatin 40.2% and Rosuvastatin 35.8%.

Conclusion: Prevalence of dyslipidaemia was 55.8% with LDLC being the most common. The effect of the Statins was a significant improvement on the plasma lipid levels.

Keywords: Prevalence, dyslipidaemia, medications, management

Introduction

Dyslipidaemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases that can be identified and effectively managed.

Aim/Objectives

To investigate prevalence and describe pattern of dyslipidaemia in hypertensive patients. The study also identified medications used in management and the effect of therapy on abnormal lipid levels.          

Methods

A descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out on hypertensive patients attending the Medical Out-Patient clinic of the Federal Medical Centre, Asaba. Using a data form: basic demographics, Blood Pressure readings, Body Mass Index, medications prescribed and fasting lipid profile reports at initial and after eight weeks of therapy were collected. Dyslipidaemia was defined by the third report of National Cholesterol Education Panel while effect of therapy was defined by National Lipid Association guidelines. Descriptive analysis was computed and compared inferentially using Student’s t-test and Pearson’s coefficient at p < 0.05.

Results

A total of 518 patients were evaluated in the study (female: 60 .8%) with a mean age of 53.05 ± 11.76 years. Mean Body Mass Index was 27.54 ± 3.05 for males and 28.37 ± 5.62 for females. Prevalence of dyslipidaemia was 55.8% with the pattern being Low Density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC), High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDLC), Total Cholesterol (TC) and Triglycerides (TG) in descending order. Statins (Atorvastatin, Simvastatin, Rosuvastatin) were the medications used for therapy.  The mean percentage reduction of Atorvastatin was 27.3% (TC), 15.0% (TG), and 34.3% (LDLC) while HDLC had 21.2% increase. Simvastatin effect was reductions of 21.9% (TC), 5.3% (TG), 40.2% (LDLC) and increase of 19.4% on HDL-C. Rosuvastatin had an increase of 25.71% on HDL-C and mean reductions of 24.5% (TC), 25.6% (TG) and 35.8% (LDLC). The observed effects were significant with p values < 0.05. No correlation was observed between response to therapy and age/gender.

Conclusion

Prevalence of dyslipidaemia was 55.8% in the hypertensive patients studied with LDLC being the most common. Statins were the medications employed in management. The effect of these medications was a significant improvement on the plasma lipid levels.

References

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  4. Fajemirokun TO. Dyslipidaemia In: Therapeutic basis of clinical pharmacy in the tropics. 4th edition.  Aguwa CN (Ed). Snapp Press Ltd Enugu; 2012. pp. 164-177.
  5. Jacobson TA, Ito MK, Maki KC, Orringer CE, Bays HE; Jones PH. National Lipid Association Recommendation for patient-centered management of dyslipidaemia. Part 1. J Clin Lipidol 2015; 9(2):129-169.
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